Future Graphics

Sep

13-16

2014

10.30am–5.30pm

Free Event

Room 56c, British Galleries, (Level 2)

http://vam.ac.uk

Talk / Seminar

A free programme of short films showcasing cutting-edge motion graphics, CGI environments and digital art on film. Curated by Design on Film, Factory Fifteen and Penny Hilton, the films play on a loop throughout the V&A’s opening hours – drop in whenever you like.

The programme is made up of three segments curated by Jonathan Gales, Penny Hilton and Phoenix Fry.

Jonathan Gales is the director of Factory Fifteen, a Brixton-based creative studio that works in film direction, production design, visual effects and architectural communication.

• Augmented (hyper)reality - Domestic Robocop (Keiichi Matsuda) explores the limits of how we invite technology into our lives.
• Somewhere (Paul Nicholls, Factory Fifteen) builds on a similar theme taking this further with downloadable possessions and treating architecture and space as we do a service like spotify.
• The Transcendent City (Richard Hardy) is a beautiful vision of a world where nature and technology are in symbiosis; this is probably the most positive short in the programme.
• Robots of Brixton (Kibwe Tavares, Factory Fifteen) allegories the 1980's Brixton riots within a new cyclical robot workforce
• Megalomania (Jonathan Gales, Factory Fifteen) is a comment on the construction of our cities in the race for iconography and capital
• Jonah (Kibwe Tavares, Factory Fifteen) is a wonderful tale about how a beautiful fishing town can develop on the tourism and fame of a giant jumping fish.

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Penny Hilton is leader of the MA Motion Design at London College of Communication. Assisted by Bartosz Druszcz, she presents a selection of motion graphics from new directors. Produced as outputs from the postgraduate design course she leads, the short films are chosen to reflect the disparate applications of this ever-evolving format.

• Polish Patterns (Bartosz Druszcz) . Based on a collection of traditional Polish weaves Bartosz expresses in motion the essence of this fading skill.
• Leon’s Story (Sam Campbell). Using the motif of a window, Sam explores the reduced view a window frame offers. Based on the story of Leon Greenman, a survivor of Auschwitz who on return to London faced further racism, Sams simple animated film illustrates the restrictions of a narrowed perspective, both literally and metaphorically.
• Hotel Lounge (Julia Braga). As a new arrival to London, Brazilian photographer Julia explores feelings of displacement and belonging, ambivalence and conflict in these films designed for multiscreen installation.
• Glaciers from Delu(g)ional Games (Eduarda Lima). Produced for the United Nations Climate Change Conference, Eduarda explores the role of Graphic Design in both promoting awareness of global warming and encouraging a pro-active attitude.
• Liquid (Penny Hilton). Is it possible to design motion graphics to have direct impact on mood and encourage a change in behaviour ? Through a series of live projects Penny’s research explores this idea. This excerpt is from a programme of films made to aid recovery from Eating Disorders.
• Yolk (Elias Freiberger). Using Cinema 4D Elias’s film reflects the cycle of life through a stripped down, looping narrative.
• Alice Live Event (Bexhill) (James Symmonds). Working with the East Sussex School of Performing Arts, James uses video mapping and architectural projection to promote a stage production of Lewis Carrolls Alice in Wonderland.
• Education for Pakistan Election (Samad Iqbal). How can you employ graphic design to encourage young Pakistanis to vote ? Samad takes three burgeoning issues and presents them in a way to encourage action.
• Design Starts Here (Elias Freiberger). With the proliferation of motion graphics industries, Elias reminds us that good design originates from solid ideas and clear thinking rather than technique and software.
• Freedom Campaign 01 (Alberta Torres). With ever increasing numbers of migrants making treacherous journeys to enter England, Alberta attempts raise awareness of their plight by paralleling their experience to London’s rush hour commuters.
• Aeroerror (Julia Braga). As a new arrival to London, Brazilian photographer Julia explores feelings of displacement and belonging, ambivalence and conflict in these films designed for multiscreen installation.
• The Light Circus (Paulina Gajewska). Referencing Polish Cryk posters of the 1960s and the Bauhaus concept of play Paulina explores the theme of circus through video projection. This large scale experiment transforms the façade of London College of Communication’s tower block in the Elephant and Castle.
• Dreamscaping (Angie Kordella). Using simple line animation Angie attempts to exorcise the recurring nightmare she has been plague with since childhood.
• Reduce Flights from Delu(g)ional Games (Eduarda Lima). Produced for the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen Eduarda explores the role of Graphic Design in both promoting awareness of global warming and encouraging a pro-active attitude.
• Slowly Open (David Daniels) . MA Graphic Moving Image tutor David uses AfterEffects to produce this animated response to music composed by Jules Maxwell.
• Military Spending (Samad Iqbal). How can you employ graphic design to encourage young Pakistanis to vote ? Samad takes three burgeoning issues and presents them in a way to encourage action.
• Freedom Campaign 02 (Alberta Torres) . With ever increasing numbers of migrants making treacherous journeys to enter England, Alberta attempts raise awareness of their plight by paralleling their experience to London’s rush hour commuters.
• King Of Gaps (Maria Reis S. Rocha). These excerpts are from a longer piece designed as an interactive projection to visually interpret the poem of Fernando Pessoa.
• The Mesh (Bartosz Druszcz). Based on the novel ‘In Free Fall’ by Juli Keh, Bartosz explores the theoretical physics concept known as the Many-Worlds Interpretation in which everything that is at all possible exists somewhere.
• The Arms (Yi-Chun Lin). Referencing an ancient legend Pangu written by Xu Zheng around 250AD, this narrative piece tells the story of creation. While exploiting a glitch aesthetic Yi-Chin scans 2D illustrations to manipulate digitally in Aftereffects. This is work currently in progress.
• Reduce Meat from Delu(g)ional Games (Eduarda Lima). Produced for the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen Eduarda explores the role of Graphic Design in both promoting awareness of global warming and encouraging a pro-active attitude.
• Sibelius 4th (Sarah Culross). Designed as a projection for live orchestra performance, this animated sequence attempts to engage audiences to classical events, at the same time enhancing the live experience of those already familiar (with the piece) by referencing the composers influences.
• Type on Screen (Alessandro Foschini ). Allessandra reviews the changing face of typography as the transition from print to screen unfolds, and old media becomes new. In particular, he communicates the controlling role the designer has over the audience.
• Freedom Campaign 03 (Alberta Torres). With ever increasing numbers of migrants making treacherous journeys to enter England, Alberta attempts raise awareness of their plight by paralleling their experience to London’s rush hour commuters.
• Corruption (Samad Iqbal). How can you employ graphic design to encourage young Pakistanis to vote ? Samad takes three burgeoning issues and presents them in a way to encourage action.
• Legs (Shirin Ebrahimi Asil). By experimenting with time manipulation past and present, Shirin plays with the brief moment of intersection and transforms the familiar to something almost alien.
• Untitled (Lee Tesche). By giving a voice to three everyday inanimate objects, Lee explores a narrative from the personal perspective of an underground train, a coin and an advertising poster.
• Sound and City (JaeHo Hwang). Jae experiments with visual ways to represent an environment effected by sound.

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Phoenix Fry is the film programmer and project manager behind some 120 film screenings - including Nollywood Now, Mondo Pop and London Design Festival @ V&A. He has selected works by four artists on the MA/MFA in Computational Arts at Goldsmiths, University of London.

• L-Pattern (Angie Fang) uses a grammar­based system which simulates the growth of plants.
• Road Collage (Matilda Skelton Mace) works with the building blocks of reality: space, light, and geometric form. Matilda is interested in the ‘in between’, exploring ideas of implied, imagined and virtual space, the dissonance that can arise between real and virtual and the way we perceive it.
• One Day in the Life of B (Matthias Moos) uses a modified flocking algorithm to create something like a Howard Hodgkins painting in motion.
• Bud (Angie Fang) imitates the process of blooming flowers but in an abstract way. The film brings nature into a hyperreal world and represents it as a vibrant form in an audiovisual unity.
• Network (Ulla Nolden) investigates the complex way in which spiders move their legs. In this recording the moves seem to follow no constructive purpose or pattern. Ulla highlights this by creating a 3-dimensional structure, using the spider’s movements to modify it constantly.
• Entity (Ulla Nolden) is one of a series of films that abstract the movement of spiders walking and distills it into an algorithm that informs the movement of digital entities.
• The Purest Of All Sounds (Matthias Moos) records a live audiovisual performance created using Open Frameworks, Max/Msp and a Midi Controller.

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